Standing tall and proud, protecting an ancient city from invaders that have long come and gone, is a majestic monument that deserves the highest praise and admiration. The iconic Galle Dutch Fort, that proudly marks the border of the coastal city of Galle, is an attraction that possesses timeless elegance and grandeur.

Galle Fort

Galle Fort

History of the site

Galle Fort is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that countless tourists and locals visit throughout the year. The fort is also known as Dutch Fort and Ramparts of Galle. The majestic fort was built by the Portuguese back in the year 1588, when they were ruling the territory. After the Dutch took over the reins from the Portuguese, the fort was extensively fortified. The fort which has braved the winds of time for over 400 years continues to amaze visitors with it spectacular appearance.

Galle Fort

Galle Fort

To this day you will find flourishing communities of Dutch people residing within the boundaries of the fort. They have added rich colour to the tapestry of life in the city in remarkable ways. The environs of the Galle Fort are perfect for casual strolls too! You will find many hotels and restaurants in the region entertaining all who visit the fort. The oldest breadfruit tree in the island can also be seen at the Akersloot Bastion in Galle Fort! A number of foreign artists, writers, poets and photographers live around the area, adding to the superior charms of the fort.

Galle Fort

The devastating Boxing Day tsunami of 2004 destroyed parts of the Galle Fort. After the incident the regal monument was extensively renovated and refurbished by the Sri Lankan government.

Galle Fort

Galle Fort

You can visit Galle Fort with ease as you are travelling in the country with Green Holiday Centre. Spend a full day of leisure absorbing the loveliness of this coastal city while marvelling at the rich splendour of the Galle Fort and create perfect memories to cherish for a lifetime!

Galle Fort

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here